Welcome

Welcome

We hope that you enjoy your visit to our website, and that you find any information you are looking for. Please feel free to contact the school direct with any queries you may have. Thank you for visiting!

School Updates

Keep up-to-date with what's happening.

Swipe content

Noticeboard

Noticeboard
  • No items to display.
Read more

Attendance

Attendance
  • Whole School
  • Reception
  • KS1
  • KS2

Awards

Awards
 

Interactive bar

School Logo

Welcome to

Spring Meadow

Primary School

Aim High, Inspire, Make a Difference

Get in touch

Contact Details

Slideshow

History

A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree with no roots’- Marcus Garvey

 

Purpose of study 

Our high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world (and how to place events within a timeline). It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past and how people used to live. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence with reference to primary and secondary sources, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives over time, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity, why the world exists as it does and the challenges of their time and how their impact is felt today. 

 

Aims

Our curriculum aims to ensure that all pupils: 

  • Know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced, and been influenced by, the wider world 
  • Know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind 
  • Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses 
  • Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed 
  • Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

Organisation

  • History is mostly taught in topics although not every topic will contain history. Teachers have freedom to place their history units anywhere over the school year.  Children should be aware of when they are studying history as opposed to other topic-based lessons.
  • History units have been chosen to offer breadth in both the balance of British and world history and in the teaching of the full ‘sweep’ of British history (stone age to modern Britain) 
  • History units are not taught chronologically. Instead, they are matched to the maturity and conceptual understanding of the pupils.  Year groups also have a balance of ancient, early British and late British history to give a breadth of knowledge.

History Curriculum Overview

Top